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MRA Issues Repair and Rebuilding Warning in Hurricane Aftermath

MRA Repair warning
October 14, 2022 at 12:00 p.m.

Now that Hurricane Ian has passed, the Metal Roofing Alliance offers advice on ways to stay vigilant when hiring a contractor. 

The recovery effort from the damage caused by Hurricane Ian is sure to be a long, difficult road for many homeowners seeking to repair or rebuild.

Unfortunately, the challenge can be made that much harder by less-than-reputable opportunists and con artists who sometimes prey on unsuspecting homeowners, especially at a time when the demand for quality contractors is extremely high. It’s a danger the Metal Roofing Alliance (MRA) is warning homeowners about, especially as re-roofing activity spikes in areas like Florida and the Carolinas.

“It’s tragic to hear stories of homeowners, who are already suffering and stressed, being preyed upon by unethical business practices,” said Renee Ramey, MRA Executive Director. “It is vital that homeowners take the necessary steps to protect themselves and their investment to ensure a job well done.”

Building materials known for better durability and protection, such as metal roofing, generate high demand in regions needing to rebuild after hurricanes and severe climate events. During these times, Ramey advises homeowners to be on guard for unscrupulous installers trying to pass off inferior material from unknown sources and offering too-good-to-be-true discounts or “deals.” MRA also offers specific information related to metal roofs and hurricane and severe storm protection.

In general, disaster recovery organizations caution homeowners to be suspicious of any contractor who demands cash or full payment upfront, has no physical address or identification, steers you to a specific lender or tries to act as the intermediary by asking to file insurance claims on your behalf, or wants your personal financial information prior to starting the repair or lending process. Always make sure any contractor or roofer is licensed and insured, verify their web and physical address, ask for references, get cost estimates, schedules and other agreements in writing, ensure they have the right permits and try to get at least three different quotes to compare before starting the project. FEMA also offers homeowners in disaster recovery areas additional tips to help avoid scams.

As a nonprofit organization, Metal Roofing Alliance helps homeowners find quality installers by working with member metal roofing manufacturers, who vet contractors before they are qualified to become an MRA member. Even so, patience and persistence are key; in times of extremely high demand and massive rebuilding and repair needs, lead times for good contractors can be very long and many are completely booked for months. However, to make sure a job is done well, it can be worth the wait. MRA advises that before a metal roofing project starts, good questions for homeowners to ask include:

  • Where is the metal roofing material manufactured?
  • What type of metal is it and what protective coatings does it have? Is it verified for residential use?
  • What kind of product and installation warranties are offered, are they transferable and how long is the product guaranteed to last?
  • What verifiable safety, performance and environmental standards, testing and regulations do the manufacturer adhere to?
  • What type of performance ratings does the product have for conditions such as severe weather and fire protection?
  • What customer service support does the manufacturer offer should an issue, problem orquestion arises?
  • How long has the manufacturer and installer been in business? What is their track record?
  • Does the manufacturer have favorable reviews from other customers and credible, third-party business rating organizations?
  • Are they members of industry-leading trade organizations, such as the MRA?

To ensure maximum, long-lasting protection for their home, MRA also offers extensive resources for homeowners to arm themselves with knowledge prior to investing in a new metal roof. The latest edition of the MRA Residential Metal Roofing Buyer’s Guide is now available for free at https://www.metalroofing.com/news/download-mra-residential-metal-roofing-buyers-guide/

About The Metal Roofing Alliance (MRA)

Representing the residential metal roofing industry in the United States and Canada, the Metal Roofing Alliance (MRA) was formed to help educate consumers about the many benefits of metal roofing. For more information about MRA membership, residential metal roofing resources and tools, visit MRA at www.metalroofing.com.



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